Archive for stand alone

DEVIL RED By Joe R. Lansdale – Reviewed

Posted in Reviews with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 1, 2015 by stanleyriiks

Although the Hap and Leonard series contains pretty much stand-alone novels, I came to this one having missed at least one book. The book I missed was Vanilla Ride, and unfortunately that book is quite heavily referenced in this one. It gives the backstory of Hap and Leonard’s meeting with the assassin Vanilla, who appears in this book. That was a little annoying, but reading a series out of sequence that kind of thing is bound to happen.

So, if you’re coming to this book never having read a Hap and Leonard story stop right now. Go back to the bookshop, or amazon, or wherever you got the book and buy The Bottoms, that’s Hap and Leonards first adventure and it’s one of Lansdale’s best novels. Which, for a writer of Lansdale’s immense talent, says a lot.

Hap and Leonard, a couple of middle-aged men who work for a local private detective, find themselves looking into a murder from some years ago. As they question and follow the clues more murders start to appear, and a mysterious red devil symbol is drawn at the crime scenes.

But as they get closer to this serial killer their own lives become endangered…

Landsale writes with a unique style, and the short, sharp dialogue moves the story along as a nice fast pace. The atmosphere and characters are rich and powerful, his action set-pieces roll along swiftly, and you don’t even have time to pause for breathe.

This is East Texas crime action as its very best. Lansdale is on form, and the Hap and Leonard novels never fail to entertain or impress.

THE DEPARTURE By Neal Asher – Reviewed

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 1, 2013 by stanleyriiks

A few hundred years in the future, the world is run by the Committee: an evil, faceless bureaucracy that punishes disagreeable thought, and polices the world with robotic killers, and the Inspectorate (a military police force who crack down on the populace without mercy). Earth is running out of food, resources are depleted after the world is raped and abused. Billions must die so that the Committee can continue to rule those that are left, those deemed societally valuable. Those not valuable to society or the Committee (zero-assets or ZAs) will be killed, slaughtered by a massive set of lasers orbiting the planet.

The small Mars colony is abandoned by a resource hungry Earth, the Committee set about planning the murder of those not valuable enough to continue living when one of them finds out about the Committee’s plans. A rebellion is about to take place on Mars.

Alan Saul wakes up on his way to an incinerator (where the Committee sends its enemies), and sets about causing as much pain as he can to the Committee and those responsible to turning him into the man he is today. The man who remembers nothing of his past over than it was wiped from his memory by pain.

This is Asher’s modern take on 1984.

I’m a bit of a fan of Asher, and I do mean a bit. I really enjoyed the adventure and exploration of The Skinner, but found the second book in the Spatterjay series, The Voyage of the Sable Keech to be repetitive and disappointing, so I was looking forward to trying a new series from the author. This one looked a little more action-packed, so I thought I’d give this a go. To a certain extent it is action-packed, but Asher’s writing style doesn’t lend itself to speed and pace, there is a lot of description, and everything is explained fully so the world we explore is finely detailed and exciting. But there’s a distinct lack of speed, the action is realised with Asher’s trademark adventure style (like paddling along a river in a row boat [albeit a river filled with flesh-eating monsters and surrounded on all sides from immortal pirates]), not the pace and drive of an Andy Remic novel (a rollercoaster thrill-ride that’ll take your breath away).

Having said that the book builds nicely towards the climax, even if the action sequences aren’t as action-packed or as fast-paced as you might expect. The world is a genuinely entertaining dystopia, and Asher’s characters are compelling, Saul in particular is someone who is massively memorable.

This is part of the Owner series, and do not misunderstand, this is in no way a stand-alone novel. It ends on a massive cliff-hanger halfway through the story, and you have to continue with Zero Point, the second book in the series which I will be reading shortly.

Asher has created an amazing world and some great characters, but the promise of an action-lead novel doesn’t quite materialise. This is more of the same, adventure and excitement, not a full, in-your-face action-a-thon.  Still enjoyable, and I’ll be reading Zero Point to make sure I find out how the stories continues, as it just gets really interesting at the end of this book.