Archive for torment

Morpheus Tales July Supplement – Line Up So Far…

Posted in Morpheus Tales Magazine, Reviews, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 13, 2011 by stanleyriiks

Been working hard on this all morning, so I thought I’d share. The contents page is looking very much like this, and the free online non-fiction magazine will be launched in July to accompany the publication of Morpheus Tales #13.

And Now… An Important Message From Trevor Wright
EMBEDDED By Dan Abnett
ZOMBIE, OHIO: A Tale of the Undead By Scott Kenemore
Wayne Simmons Interview By Stanley Riiks
HELL RIG By J.E. Gurley
CORSETS AND CLOCKWORK Edited By Trisha Telep
SCREAM 4
UNGRATEFUL DEAD By Naomi Clark
STRANGE MEN IN PINSTRIPE SUITS AND OTHER CURIOUS THINGS By Cate Gardner
ZOMBIES AND POWER TOOLS By Alan Spencer
SKULLS By Tim Marquitz
Guidance from the Dark Scribe: When It’s NOT Writer’s Block By Ty Schwamberger
THE DAMNED BUSTERS (Book One of To Hell and Back) By Matthew Hughes
SKYLINE
HAUNTING BLUE By R.J. Sullivan
ABRAHAM LINCOLN VAMPIRE HUNTER By Seth Grahame-Smith
THE ABOLISHER OF ROSES By Gary Fry
The New Publishing Model: Benefits and Drawbacks: Book Promotions and Marketing By Cyrus Wraith Walker
SUCKER PUNCH
DAMAGED By Yolanda Sfetsos
RUBBER
BLUE FIRE BURNING: TALES OF THE PAHLEEN By Hobb Whittons
Julie Anne Interview By Trevor Wright
AS I EMBRACE MY JAGGED EDGES By Lee Thompson
ETHEREAL TALES #11
TRILOGY OF BLOOD
Some of the Best Zombie Series on the Market By Eric S. Brown
MONK PUNK Edited By A. J. French
DOA – EXTREME HORROR ANTHOLOGY Edited By David C. Hayes and Jack Burton
TORMENT By Greg Chapman
THE CONCRETE GROVE By Gary McMahon
Interview with Ben Baldwin
DANCING WITH THE VELVET LIZARD By Bruce Golden

The free magazine will be available in July to read, view or download. Check out the website for the current and past issues:

www.morpheustales.com

HARBINGER OF THE STORM By Aliette de Bodard – Reviewed

Posted in Morpheus Tales Magazine, Reviews, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 2, 2011 by stanleyriiks

With the kind permission of Morpheus Tales. This review will appear in the April issue of the  MT Supplement.

You know how sometimes when you meet someone for the first time, for absolutely no reason that you can put your finger on, you have an instant dislike – like a kind of anti-chemistry – and as you get to know them a little better you find out your initial instinct was complete and absolutely correct? (Lots of people who meet me for the first time get this impression.) That’s what happened with this book.

It should have been fine. A murder mystery set in Aztec Mexico at the height of the Aztec empire, somewhere around the fifteen century. Sounds interesting enough. Except that it’s really not. It’s not a murder mystery for a start; it’s more a political drama with a few deaths and murders thrown in. This is not Poirot. The story is much more reminiscent of Macbeth or Hamlet as it follows of the political intrigues when the ruler dies and his replacement must be found.

The minutiae of finding the new leader is epic, on a scale that even those not taking an instant dislike to, will find hard to bare. De Bodard, in her afterword, says herself that the process would likely have been shorter than she’d written it. Of course it would. The only things that would feel longer would have been having my fingernails removed with pliers, or my testicles boiled on a low heat.

One of the problems with the book is that you just don’t care. The characters, with their incomprehensible and mispronounce-able names, are interchangeable, having no distinguishing characteristics. The fact that half of them are priests and the other half are imperial family doesn’t help matters. There’s so little tension that a couple of deaths acts only to wake you up a little.

The fantastic Aztec Mexican setting is ruined by keeping everything within the courtly areas of the temples. There’s no jungle, no danger, no atmosphere. The Aztec setting, rather than spicing things up just adds to the confusion with the many-syllable names and a little of their religion. For one of the most blood-thirsty warrior nations in the world there’s little blood-shed, only once is sacrifice mentioned, and there’s absolutely nothing to help alleviate the boredom.

Can a book really be that bad? Everything good you might imagine should be contained in this book has somehow been removed. It’s rather like my mother’s cooking, when at her worse she manages to remove everything that’s good from every single ingredient until what you end up with is a vapid, insipid, flavourless slop. De Bodard seems to have fashioned this book in the same way. What should work just does not, and it doesn’t work unrelentingly. A failure of epic proportions, but a book that can be read. Probably the worst book I remember finishing, but finish it I did, and I feel quite proud to have suffered such torment and survived. I can only hope that Volume 1 in the Obsidian and Blood series was very different, and that the following third volume won’t make the same mistakes as the second.

Of course there are worse fates than having to read this book again, waterboarding or the aforementioned bollock boiling. Both of which I would recommend before attempting to read this.

www.angryrobotbooks.com